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Hi boys,

Just bought myself a crate stack, and the back only has ONE speaker output.

So when i connect the two cabs together, i think the only way is to conncet the 2 cabs together with a lead, and 1 cab conected to the head.
This seems to make it loose output from the top cab tho, in favour of like splitting the output bwtween them...

Is this all good and dandy or is there anythging i can do...?

I may have to draw a diagram here lol

Cheers if you know, it'd be well appreciated!

Kev
 

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I don't think it messes with the tone, but it does sound like a cost-cutting thing to me...
 

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I went to the Crate web site at www.crateamps.com and they don't give much more info there. At least you could email them for an answer to your question. I would include the model number for your head and speaker cabs. Hope this helps. :icon_peac
 

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themaidenmaniac said:
Hi boys,

Just bought myself a crate stack, and the back only has ONE speaker output.

So when i connect the two cabs together, i think the only way is to conncet the 2 cabs together with a lead, and 1 cab conected to the head.
You can't just wire two cabs together like that, you have to be careful and know what you are doing. If you wire in series I don't know what happens but it shouldn't blow anything up because impedance is increased. But if you wire in parellel then impedance is halved (assuming same impedance w/ cabs and it most definately should be) and then you can, and probably will, blow something up.

I speak from experience...I learned the hard way. You will blow your output transformer and that can be an expensive repair.

What you have to do is get two cabs that are rated at twice the impedance that the amp is and then wire them in parallel. Then you have a properly balanced system and you shouldn't blow anything up.

Also you can alternatively get two cabs rated at half the impedance of the amp and wire them in serial.

To describe the diff, since I can't seem to make decent diagrams: In serial Red goes to + of one speaker, out the -, and into the + of the next. Black goes to the - of the second speaker. In parallel Red goes to + of both, and black the same. (of course color is arbitrary, the connections are the important part)

At least that is my understanding...

Sorry if this seems basic, but I figure if you are asking this question it might not be.
 

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check on the back of the amp...(as i'm not sure what model you have) to see if there is an impedance selector switch.

Check on the back of the cabinets, to see what impedances you have for cabinets....

now e.g. if you have (2) 16 ohm cabinets, you wire them in parallel to get 8 ohms... then select 8 ohms on the back of the cabinet.

if you had (2) 8 ohm cabinets, then you wire them in series to get 16 ohms, and select 16 ohms on the back of the amp...

my crate has 2 outputs from the head, a selector switch. My cabinets have 3 jacks, and a selector switch... so check that stuff out!
 

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Lazertronic said:
check on the back of the amp...(as i'm not sure what model you have) to see if there is an impedance selector switch.

Check on the back of the cabinets, to see what impedances you have for cabinets....

my crate has 2 outputs from the head, a selector switch. My cabinets have 3 jacks, and a selector switch... so check that stuff out!
Yes, series doubles, paralell halves. That is why speakers come in packages of 4 :twisted: (two series + two parallel = original rating)

My amp has two outputs and I still have to watch my selctions. I have 4,8,16 and if I plug in two it wires in paralel. So for instance if I had 2 4 ohm cabs I would blow my head (no selector for 2)...and then I would have to blow my head...
 

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I think the point is being missed here.... The guys original problem is having a power loss in one cabinet when they are chained together...Its a matter of mix matched cabs or one is wired series the other in parallel. not if he has a multiple impedence switch on his head. He can change that all day long and not make a bit of difference in the cab thats dropping volume.
There are so many wiring configurations for cabinets its impossible to guess what it is. I could be series only . parallel only. series parallel. or as simple as having one speaker in the cab with the wrong impedence.

This is a series/parallel connection (below). This is a lot more common in musical instrument (guitar and bass guitar) speaker cabinets.
This allows you to wire a cabinet and keep the same impedence throughout the cabinet

 

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nroberts said:
Yes, series doubles, paralell halves. That is why speakers come in packages of 4 :twisted: (two series + two parallel = original rating)

My amp has two outputs and I still have to watch my selctions. I have 4,8,16 and if I plug in two it wires in paralel. So for instance if I had 2 4 ohm cabs I would blow my head (no selector for 2)...and then I would have to blow my head...
i guess 2x12's is a misnomer then. along with 1x12 and other extension cabs.
 

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vintage_brat said:
i guess 2x12's is a misnomer then. along with 1x12 and other extension cabs.
Yes, those don't exist. If they did they wouldn't be real anyway. ;)
 

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vintage_brat said:
I think the point is being missed here.... The guys original problem is having a power loss in one cabinet when they are chained together...
You are right, I missed that little gem. I thought he was loosing power in both. I don't know enough to advise then... I would agree that it could be some sort of impedance imbalance but what that is...
:confused:

So, check imbedances and make sure they are all the same...ask an expert that can see how you are wiring, etc...
 
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