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I don't know, I'm just trying too boost my post count
LOL Hopefully one of the guys has an answer for you Chris, but I honestly don't know.
 

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They're right in there I think. Most ticket prices are expensive, and VH's are right in that range. I paid 95 bucks for a general admission show this year, so I wasn't exactly too thrilled about that.
 

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Chris, I will send an email to a father of one of my students. He owns a company in Sydney called Rock Circuit Promotions. I am sure he may be able to answer this one for you. Cheers mate.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
ericgtr said:
[ QUOTE ]
SuckaIn3Piece said:
I don't know, I'm just trying too boost my post count


[/ QUOTE ]

LOL.. You will never catch me buddy


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Don't tempt me! I'll go Geordie on your ass and post whever I please
 

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Damn that guy is fast, here is what he said...

Promoters work in tandem with a variety of other support agencies. These create and promote merchandise, there is the venue management team and they set their own fees for the hire of the venue. As well we need to take into account the costs involved for added security, local transportation, band waivers and transportation of the gear across the country. There is also local wages to be factored for the supporting crew (many overseas bands hire crew here unless there is specialist support such as visuals and effects) Then there is the cost of the PA systems that can be sourced and finally the costs involved in the media campaigns to promote the artist. These are factored together with the up front demands of the artist and then calculated together to produce a price that will deliver a 2-3% percentage profit for the promoter. The profit though is often reduced as artists can change their minds on any of the areas above. We were severely burnt when **** *** ***** toured in 1992. There was a last minute change to local crew hire and the costs blew out and we lost major $$$. In other words, the setting of price for touring artists is a flexible and fluid process. The local promoter works in conjunction with the artist, their management company and the local record people. Lots of work but worthwhile. NOTE Simon that local promoters sometimes cannot set the prices low unless there is an agreement with the artist. Neil Diamond set his fee low for a greater % of the local merchandise take. People pay less for the show but more for the merchandise. It is not always the promoter who is greedy you see. Hope you enjoyed the C.Isaaks show. He was a dream to work with."

Hope this helps Chris.
 

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No problems mate
Sounds like a complicated and difficult game to be in.
 

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i have a book called " The Ultimate Survivial Guide to the New Music Industry" by Justin Goldberg.....it has allll that kind of info and he interviews promoters and such...its a great read you should look it up
 

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I miss the days of $10.00 concert tickets.

This has nothing to do with the original question but my ex-step-father's brother was a record & merchandise promoter for many popular 80's bands like Motley Crue, Dokken, Judas Priest....and this guy lived damn near as well as the rock stars he promoted.....he had a huge house in California and a house in Houston that I stayed at once. He had a recording studio in his Houston house and it was full of memorabilia and merchandise!! This guy was made of money. I didn't know these guys made that kind of dough? He ended up giving me some great promo 80's Metal albums, picture discs, posters that were limited & never produced to sell. That was almost 18 years ago. What a great job that would be eh?
 
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