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But why would anybody want this? It's flippin' lousy. The 7 Basement Tapes songs are nowhere near the best material that had been recorded and what ended up on these bootlegs sounded terrible.
There's several inaccuracies been assumed in prior posts.
Firstly, Great White Wonder as first issued in July 1969 didn't initially appear on TMoQ (as that was it's 3rd pressing in 1970) and the 1st issue was a no-label affair with very simple matrix nos. GF-001, GF-002 etc.
Dylan did not have any input with any of the two tapes as compiled by Hudson for distribution to other publishers. It was Hudson who had been asked by Dylan's publishers 'Dwarf Music' to compile that initial tape.
The 1st tape as compiled September 1967 contained 10 songs. In December 1967, Hudson added another 5, giving a total of 15 songs. However, somewhere along the line the song 'Get Your Rocks Off' was cut from the tape, so the 14 songs tape became the one that was sent to London and subsequently heard by several B-lister acts who grabbed what they could from it and it was these rough-tape recordings that were subsequently dubbed from and included on Great White Wonder. The tape was transferred into acetates by Dylan's US publisher Dwarf Music and sent to their UK representative 'Big Ben Music'.

In June 1969, producer Elliot Mazur (see Neil Young's 'Harvest') was asked by Hudson to make a safety copy tape of 19 songs, comprising the initial 15-song tape, plus the 3 songs as copyrighted in January 1970 (see below) and 'I'm Not There (1956)'. This particular tape remained in storage until 2007, so not included in the tally of songs as distributed.
In January 1970, a further 3 songs were copyrighted and distributed to publishers.
Later in May 1971, a 3rd tape was compiled by an unknown source, contained 11 songs including 'Sign On The Cross' and that particular tape was subsequently copyrighted in 1988.
Therefore, between 1969 and 1971 and prior to Robertson's 1975 disaster with 'The Basement Tapes', a total of 28 songs had been given to publishers.
Robertson's effort included 8 songs by The Band which had nothing to do with the 16 others with Dylan. With these 16 songs he overdubbed some with drums and guitar and compressed all of them into mono.

Initial Basement Tapes recordings were held in March 1967 at Dylan's house, in his 'Red Room' in Byrdcliffe, near Woodstock. The main body of recording was June to November 67 at the Band's house 'Big Pink' in their basement-cum-garage in neighbouring West Saugerties. Further recordings were held over winter 68 until February at a house shared by Danko and Helm in Wittenberg Road, in Bearsville, also near Woodstock. Hudson didn't see fit at any time to make any tape log info and actually recorded over previously used tapes for convenience and also used a variety of tape types, some of which are known to perish a lot faster than others.He wantonly lent stuff out and never got it back.
Basically, he made a complete pig's ear of it all, but nobody from official Columbia sources actually ever gets around to saying that out loud.
Having heard numerous bootlegs over the years and finally buying the as-then all encompassing 2001 White Bear label's 4-CD 'A Tree With Roots' and eventually ownership of the official 6-CD box set, I can honestly say that the vast majority of the 138 tracks are really hard going and perhaps a 20-track Best Of would make for the ideal listen, imho.
Given that 'Great White Wonder' aka 'Little White Wonder', 'Waters Of Oblivion' or 'Troubled Troubador' - the one with the 3 extra tacks (regardless of which particular label) is compiled from dubs of dubs, why would anyone really want to hear it today?
There's only a couple of things on it that aren't easy to find.
1. Only A Hobo - a Broadside demo from February 1963, as included on Broadside Ballads Vol. 1 as issued in September 1963
2. If You Gotta Go, Go Now - as issued as an A-side in Holland and there's a much better quality sounding version on 'Thin Wild Mercury Music' and who doesn't have a copy of that?!
These are the songs as compiled for use by publishers back in the day.
Sep/67 Garth Hudson’s Basement Tapes compilation tape
1. Million Dollar Bash
2. Yea! Heavy And A Bottle Of Bread
3. Please, Mrs Henry
4. Crash On The Levee
5. Lo And Behold!
6. Tiny Montgomery
7. If Your Memory Serves You Well (aka This Wheel’s On Fire)
8. You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere
9. Any Day Now (aka I Shall Be Released)
10. Too Much Of Nothing
Dec/67 Garth Hudson adds 5 more songs to tape

11. Tears Of Rage
12. Quinn The Eskimo
13. Open The Door, Homer
14. Nothing Was Delivered
15. Get Your Rocks Off not included on acetates, not circulated
Jan/70 songs copyrighted and circulated as Dwarf demos
1. Clothes Line Saga
2. Apple Sucking Tree
3. Odds And Ends
Mar/71 3rd Basement Tapes compilation tape (compiled by unknown)
1. Don’t Ya Tell Henry
2. Bourbon Street
3. My Woman She’s A-Leavin’
4. Santa-Fe
5. Mary Lou, I Love You Too
6. Dress It Up, Better Have It All
7. Silent Weekend
8. What’s It Gonna Be When It Comes Up
9. Wild Wolf
10. All American Boy
11. Sign On The Cross tape copyrighted in 1988
1969-71 28 songs in total given to publishers to distribute for recording purposes by other artists
 

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Thanks for the detailed info AMP59, I am always grateful to people who put the hours in to read up on these things as I'm always too busy enjoying the music. In agreement with much of your summary and of course the underlying motivations for the tape compiling are very obvious in the lack of polish and balance in the various 'mastering' efforts.
Would disagree however about the quality of the material as the test of time confirms many of the songs (and performances) as being of a very high quality, both from Bob and the Band. Of course the nature of the sessions and the vast array of material recorded reflects the motivations of the players at the various sessions and the reasons for the 'performance', everything from obvious knockabout warmups to loose jams etc.
Those requesting the remastered stuff should just seek out the reference sources (official and unofficial) for the various unconnected sessions. This will give you all the material and more in the best quality, and in a proper context too.
Minor 'gripe' in that nobody actually suggested at any point that it was on the TMoQ 'label', only that it was compiled and produced by the folks who later founded TMoQ. Your notes would seem to suggest that it was later released again on the 'label', although I have no knowledge on that and have never seen that issue. Decades ago I had a lend of a double vinyl AUD rec of a Band performance from 69/70 which looked remarkably similar to this boot in relation to the covers and labels (no info at all). I was unable to identify the date of the performance and now have only a tape recording I made on some relatively humble kit at the time. I wonder whether it was produced by the same guys? I guess I should read up on that.
It seems the whole Dylan world is united with us in their derision at Robertson's efforts. One of the biggest disappointments of my Dylan listening 'career' and record collecting odyssey was the day I finally found a mint condition original of the vinyl album, only to discover that it made precious little difference to anything and still sounded flat as a pancake!
As I said, not great sound but a document of some great history.
Thanks for your efforts to enlighten us all
 

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Thanks for the detailed info AMP59, I am always grateful to people who put the hours in to read up on these things as I'm always too busy enjoying the music. In agreement with much of your summary and of course the underlying motivations for the tape compiling are very obvious in the lack of polish and balance in the various 'mastering' efforts.
My sincere pleasure DylanDave and I'm pleased you regarded my info as a worthy addition to the discussion.
Ref the TMoQ label version, I wasn't making an issue but simply thought it prudent to mention the fact that it wasn't actually the first time out for the album, simply on the basis that TMoQ had been given a mention. Discogs provides a useful ready reckoner listing of the various issues.
Ref the Basement Tapes, of course, my point of view of the contents as a whole are subjective and having listened many times to Basement Tapes in their multiple collections, perhaps I've become somewhat jaded and I can admit to that. Perhaps as an anorak wearing uber-fan since 1974, and having attended 96 gigs since 1978 (the 1st being at Blackbushe with 200,000 others), I maybe permitted that judgement call... at least I think so!
What I'd really meant by "hard going" was directed to the technical issues with sound quality of several sections of tapes within the collection and I don't think I'm alone with that conclusion.
I made a 30-track "Best Of" for my own purposes and upon further review concluded that I could exclude several more.
The likes of "Yea! Heavy And A Bottle Of Bread", "Lo And Behold!" and "Open The Door, Homer" simply don't make my cut. Again, personal choices that naturally would not or should not meet the general consensus of opinion.
However, I would absolutely encourage all newcomers to thoroughly examine the entire recordings for themselves, as there's a host of obscurities that I certainly knew nothing about upon my introduction and led to my further discovery of many American recording artists that remain virtually unknown over in these UK shores. It's basically the layman's introduction to American Roots Music a.k.a. "Americana", with material that emerged long before any Broadside or Vanguard label compilations, at least as far as I know; and of course being in the UK, automatically dictates that one is several steps removed from that source of material. Despite owning complete collections of a plethora of UK Folk music luminaries, Anne Briggs et all, by no means was I fully conversant with many of the Scottish and Irish ballads that had been transported to America and rekindled by Dylan and friends. Time and again Dylan has pulled these obscure ballads out of a hat and his 1991-92 tours featured a number of others.
I trust this clarifies my tawdry lack of overall enthusiasm in this instance for all of the content of Basement Tapes that flies in the face of this forum's positive modus operandi. But being Scottish, we have a guaranteed eternal inherent tendency to tell it how it is.
Cheers,
AMP59
 

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I can see I am conversing with a fellow believer. Maybe my roots based music preferences (blues and jazz) which I discovered alongside Bob and Neil and Van and Joni et al back in my teens causes me to lean towards this stuff more than some others do. I am also UK based, have been to Scotland many times and had the pleasure of catching Bob in Glasgow in 91. wasn't a great gig, but it was a great weekend in the company of a trader buddy of mine from that fab city.
Of course many of Bob's more recent 'trad' choices came directly or indirectly from his admiration of Jerry and The Dead. For the record my favourite would have to be the version of 'Been All Around This World' from the final night of the majestic Hammersmith 90 shows. It's not the performance which usually gets selected for the compilations, but remains my fav nonetheless. It may be influenced a little by the prime seats I had for many of those gigs incl the final night, but there isn't much Bob I haven't heard and collected at some point.
Kind regards from London, been an interesting post and thread this one for several reasons
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I can't really see the value myself, but if it makes a few people happy.
I have upped the 50th ann ed 'Ass Blaster' fan recreation of the GWW for you. Enjoy
It'll give you the Broadside demo referred to above anyway
OK, well I'm convinced! You two are absolutely right and I found your discussion highly informative.
Also, while it is interesting to have the vinyl rip to hear what people in 1969/1970 heard, I must admit that the bootleg was pressed from some pretty poor sounding masters! I have, however, enjoyed listening to your Ass Blaster fan recreation. I love all the songs, (hard to distance myself from them objectively after years of listening to 'em!) and therefore your upload is very much appreciated. Cheers, DylanDave! Recommended to all.
Right, I'm now off to check out the Been All Around This World Hammersmith '90 performance you referenced.
 

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I can see I am conversing with a fellow believer. Maybe my roots based music preferences (blues and jazz) which I discovered alongside Bob and Neil and Van and Joni et al back in my teens causes me to lean towards this stuff more than some others do. I am also UK based, have been to Scotland many times and had the pleasure of catching Bob in Glasgow in 91. wasn't a great gig, but it was a great weekend in the company of a trader buddy of mine from that fab city.

Oh yes, I was at one of the two shows as unfortunately work commitments prevented both nights. I believe Bob had been on a drinking spree during that period and it showed. You may recall how packed that SECC Hall 3 was as the 5,000 capacity had been ignored and they stuffed 7,000 in there. I was at the 2nd night where they opened with the instrumental "Mountains Of Mourne".
Ref "Been All Around This World", last night at Hammersmith 90. Are you sure that's the title? I don't recognise it. I do know he performed "Rambling Down Through The World" at least twice elsewhere. However, checking my notes for Feb 8th 90, the last night, the only unusual title performed was the penultimate "Hang Me, Oh Hang Me". My info has maybe fallen short and it was also excluded from my tape, but I find that very odd.
 

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same song, just depends on the 'lineage' you get it from. I knew it as 'Hang Me, Oh Hang Me', I was probably one of the very few there who recognised it, but the G Dead folk lineage (where Bob prob found it) lists it with the other title. I have all kinds of sources which include the performance. Good starting point is the Doberman 5CD collection 'Hammersmith Paris 90' which includes the entire final night and most of the best bits. It was later released again (as glass mastered CD I think) with the title 'Those Were The Days'.
 

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And yes it was rammed in there at the SECC, but after travelling the length of the country (by bus!) and several pints of 'Heavy', well you know the rest...
 

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Hence, my confusion having never been a Dead Head. I have a scratchy recording of it on a comp by Grandpa Jones and D.V. Ronk did it later as Hang Me. All I have are my original 1990 trading cassettes from three of the shows and an assorted compilation best of all nights on CD which I don't think I've listened to in 30 years, so I'll give that Doberman a shot. Thanks.
 

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Wow, a real conversation where no one was offended and information was shared...... I like these kind of posts.......Thanks all for the information.
 
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