Guitars101 - Guitar Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
808 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey VH fans wanted to get your opinion on why Eds playing sets him apart from the rest of the pack?Is it his will and determination?Is it his heart?Or is it because he taught himself how to play?Whats your thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
I have always admired his ability to communicate emotion through his playing, his kickass tone, his individuality, his adventurous spirit and free-flowing style and he can write songs pretty well too!
 

·
Scandinavian noise maker!
Joined
·
2,767 Posts
His awesome rhythm and the looseness and sheer sassyness of his approach to the whole thing....music music...hehe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
I think what really makes him unique is just his overall feel and groove. I've heard guys here get his brown sound down to a T, but it's Ed's feel that make all those VH songs his. Often imitated, but never duplicated
 
G

·
The 1989 bootleg title from Japan says it all. "Got The Miracle Fingers." He's just got that touch. He knows every sound that guitar will make, no matter what he's going to do to it. It's just a firm mastery of the instrument. Edward is more familiar with the sounds of his guitars than most of us are with our own voices. It truely is an extension of himself, and it shows


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
It is his phrasing & use of notes that is quite unique. Everybody has their own sound lurking within just like everybody has differant hand writing. I really do appreciate teh talent & skills of Stariani,Vai & Malmsteen but half the time it just sounds like lots of twiddle to me. Ed is a real inspiration in coming up with great, often very simple hooks, & absolutley blistering solo's that are still phrased beautifully, not just fast scales...but then what do I know, the type of phrasing you like is pretty personal...songwriting ability & monster riffs I find Mick Mars very hard to beat...now if he could only go off to the Ed solo school that would be cool!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
This picture here says it all for me. Ed seems to be back to this style of ferocious playing. It may not be as fast as it was back in the day, but the man can really rip it up when he wants. I love watching this guy play because he plays with so much emotion and fire. I just love that shit.
 
G

·
[ QUOTE ]
SuckaIn3Piece said:
This picture here says it all for me. Ed seems to be back to this style of ferocious playing. It may not be as fast as it was back in the day, but the man can really rip it up when he wants. I love watching this guy play because he plays with so much emotion and fire. I just love that shit.


[/ QUOTE ]

It looks like he's screaming in pain... such passion. Sometimes he starts killing that thing... like he's trying to play the very life out of it. Very cool pic
Like you said... he can still rip it up when he wants to. Ed has always said that being a great guitarist meant much more than just being the next "Joe Quick." I suppose that's easy to say for someone who essentially re-invented Rock guitar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
Yea, I love it when he makes faces like that. It's just as you said, like he's just screaming. I fuckin love it. He and Jeff Beck are my two favs to watch. Just such physical guitar players that really put everything they have into every note. I think Ed gets a bad rap from critics about playing with no soul because he makes everything seems so easy. If they only knew!
 
G

·
This thread got me thinking about my favorite interview with Edward from recent years. In 1995, just after the Balance release, Guitar World did a two part feature (part one was the cover story) where Billy Corgan of Smashing Pumpkins interviewed EVH... Now I'm not a fan of Smashing Pumpkins, OR Corgan... but I attribute one of the best Eddie related quotes of all time to him. It was the introductory paragraph to the interview. Here it is:

"Make no mistake. Eddie Van Halen can still kick your ass. The man who single-handedly changed the face of rock is still mean, lean and sharp as a tack. And if you dispute the ownership of the crown, try to imagine a world without him. I came to pay my tribute, sneak a peak at that famous Marshall and meet the man I most wanted to be at 17."

Very cool thing to say. God I envied Billy Corgan the day I saw that Mag on the racks. Anyway... if you guys have never read the interview, it's a pretty good one. You can read transcripts of both parts of the interview, as well as an interview from when Gary joined the band at this address:

http://www.guitarworld.com/0100/framesets/interviews.html

There are also many other Non-VH interviews, as this is a page of the most popular GW interviews, as decided by the public. A cool page to have bookmarked, regardless


I'm walking a fine line of topic relevance here, so I'll stop now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
I read that interview once every few months, and just read it again last week. Very cool stuff indeed. It's funny cause I saw this thing on VH1 where they did this Before They Were Rock Stars thing. And there was a clip of Billy playing in some garage band when he was a teen. And he was boppin all around doin these tappin bends and slides and shit. That just put the biggest smile on my face.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Excellent comments guys, one (of course there are several) great example of his raw natural ability is the end of Drop Dead Legs. Even though the lead is tasty it's the groove he get's going leading into it that is just bitchin, so much style and finess.

Even today, I listen to certain songs and just think to myself wtf how the hell does he do that? Anyone who has tried to play certain VH tunes can understand this I am sure, it can be such a struggle to play something that for him, just rolls of naturally. I guess the bottom line is that the man is simply gifted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
Well said Eric. DDL is my favorite Halen tune so I totally hear what you're saying about that one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
I think Eddie's playing is the perfect blend of knowledge and non-conformity. I'll say it again. You need to know the rules to break them and regardless of what he says, Eddie is a schooled musician. The odd time breaks and arrangements that he comes up with tell you that he's had some Jazz and classical training. (Which he admits) Mix all that with his heart and fire and you get the baddest mutha on the planet, the king of 10 fingers and six strings, Eddie Van Halen. "If it sounds good then it IS good."
 
G

·
[ QUOTE ]
VanMan2000 said:
I think Eddie's playing is the perfect blend of knowledge and non-conformity. I'll say it again. You need to know the rules to break them and regardless of what he says, Eddie is a schooled musician. The odd time breaks and arrangements that he comes up with tell you that he's had some Jazz and classical training. (Which he admits) Mix all that with his heart and fire and you get the baddest mutha on the planet, the king of 10 fingers and six strings, Eddie Van Halen. "If it sounds good then it IS good."

[/ QUOTE ]

No doubt VM. The early training Edward had has certainly boosted his musical abilities in the long run. It's the boring stuff that was drilled into his head as a youth... music theory, classical arrangement, and the general standards that applied to making sounds into "music." This knowledge, that became second nature, combined with the natural desire of youth to break free of standards applied to them by earlier generations, gave him the perfect way to express himself... well, the hot chicks, parties, and booze fueled by the fire of Roth's personality helped him express a lot too
There was an interview once where Ed was talking about when he had started to learn violin as a youth. He said he'd just get bored with it and start screwing around trying to come up with cool sounds... Wasn't raw enough, gritty enough, or nearly mean enough. Little did he know what he would later do for the world of an electric instrument that's fundamentally not all that different from the violin he was "screwing around with."

Ok. Every now and then I just have to overanalyze Edward... it soothes me... I feel better now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
My answer touches on something that was highlighted in Sucka's Bootleg forum.

It all boils down to the feel and touch that they guy has, but a perfect example of why he's set aside from everyone else is the mistakes he makes, and more importantly, how he recovers from them.

Ed calls it, "Falling down the stairs and landing on your feet"

There's so many times on bootlegs where he'll mess up, or he'll play a different riff, or he'll just do some crazy sort of squeal or sound, yet he'll somehow find a way to return to the rhythm that makes it sound sorta, well, right. Like that's just what is meant to be played by him and heard by you.

Most of the time, you don't notice it, because he makes the transitions so seamless. And that's the genious of him to me. The going from solid rhythm, to crazy shit (intentional or not), and back again in such an effortless move.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Definitely the best groove player of all time. The way he changes up the rhytm ever so slightly each time around. The different approaches to soloing, making it fit the song. The seemingly unlimited styles of songs that he writes, while still keeping that signature sound. And of course, the grin....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
[ QUOTE ]
mikemellow said:
Definitely the best groove player of all time. The way he changes up the rhytm ever so slightly each time around. The different approaches to soloing, making it fit the song. The seemingly unlimited styles of songs that he writes, while still keeping that signature sound. And of course, the grin....


[/ QUOTE ]

I forgot the grin !!!

 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top