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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm posting this here because I've seen a bunch of members offer to digitize and restore old audio tapes, so I'm hoping someone can help.

I have a bunch of CDRs from the late '90s given to me with labels glued on the non-playing sides. The files on the discs are all .cda files, none of which would play on a Mac. Using a PC, I converted them all to .wav files using a program called Switch Sound File Converter. The files now play on the PC but all have that static-y noise in the background.

I tried Audacity's noise reduction filter, but it requires sampling the unwanted noise by itself, and the static always seems to appear on top of the music only. I've searched online for audio restoration software and have seen recommendations like VLC, but none specify eliminating this specific problem.

I'm well aware of the longevity of CDRs, and the music on these discs, of course, is irreplaceable (hence trying to back them up now).

Is there any hope for retrieving the music on these discs without the static, or are my converted-with-noise .wav files the best results I'm likely to get? I imagine I'm not the only person here who would benefit from any suggestions.

Many thanks in advance!

(I also posted this in the Home Recording forum, so please forgive the double-post.)
 

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Im not a MAC user but "The CDA file extension is a data format known as CD Audio Track Shortcut. CDA files are small (44 bytes) virtual file created by Microsoft Windows CD driver for each track on an audio CD. They contain indexing information such as track times plus a special Windows shortcut that allows users to access the specific audio tracks. They do not contain music, instead point to where the music is located on the CD. These files instruct the computer which audio track to play on a CD. CDA files will not play when separated from the CD they represent. Converting CDA files is called ripping, which is copying music from a CD onto a computer. These files can be converted to WAV, MP3, WMA, OGG, and FLAC. Files in CDA format can be opened with Apple iTunes, VideoLAN VLC media player and other audio player in Mac Os, Microsoft Windows based and Linux platforms."

Are you sure there are no other files on the cdrs, try using XLD for mac to rip the cdr.
 

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I'm posting this here because I've seen a bunch of members offer to digitize and restore old audio tapes, so I'm hoping someone can help.

I have a bunch of CDRs from the late '90s given to me with labels glued on the non-playing sides. The files on the discs are all .cda files, none of which would play on a Mac. Using a PC, I converted them all to .wav files using a program called Switch Sound File Converter. The files now play on the PC but all have that static-y noise in the background.

I tried Audacity's noise reduction filter, but it requires sampling the unwanted noise by itself, and the static always seems to appear on top of the music only. I've searched online for audio restoration software and have seen recommendations like VLC, but none specify eliminating this specific problem.

I'm well aware of the longevity of CDRs, and the music on these discs, of course, is irreplaceable (hence trying to back them up now).

Is there any hope for retrieving the music on these discs without the static, or are my converted-with-noise .wav files the best results I'm likely to get? I imagine I'm not the only person here who would benefit from any suggestions.

Many thanks in advance!

(I also posted this in the Home Recording forum, so please forgive the double-post.)
If you have some Guns N' Roses audio, I could work on it
 

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I had over 10,000 cd-r's at one point. Most held up well and were ripped to hard drives. The few hundred that I had labels on, every one of those were shot. Those labels just destroyed the discs and there's no recovering them from my experience. But I was able to track down everything I needed online. So that would be my advice. Everything I needed circulates on hubs and torrent sites or places like here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I had over 10,000 cd-r's at one point. Most held up well and were ripped to hard drives. The few hundred that I had labels on, every one of those were shot. Those labels just destroyed the discs and there's no recovering them from my experience. But I was able to track down everything I needed online. So that would be my advice. Everything I needed circulates on hubs and torrent sites or places like here.
Thanks. Unfortunately these discs came from a composer, and the material is definitely nowhere to be found online.

Fwiw, someone on a different forum gave me these details about labeled discs:

"CDRs with adhesive labels are ticking time bombs. The expansion coefficient of the label is different than that of the polycarbonate on the CD, and so, over time, with changes in heat and humidity, the label starts to stress the polycarbonate and you get fissures and fractures. Even if microscopic, these cause mechanical breakdown of the information encoded on the CDR. If you are hearing "static" after conversion, it's not the programs you are using. Rather, it's most likely errors in the data recovery, themselves a result of the corruption of the data due to the labels."
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In Windows, try re-ripping the discs using Exact Audio Copy.

Thanks. I tried EAC but it froze each time on each disc's first track. I should have also mentioned that I can't actually play the discs on EAC, Windows Media Player, or Audacity. The converted files from using Switch are the only way I can actually listen to those files.
 

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I had over 10,000 cd-r's at one point. Most held up well and were ripped to hard drives. The few hundred that I had labels on, every one of those were shot. Those labels just destroyed the discs and there's no recovering them from my experience. But I was able to track down everything I needed online. So that would be my advice. Everything I needed circulates on hubs and torrent sites or places like here.
That's been my experience as well. Those paper labels were the kiss of death.
 

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Take the labels off!!!!! They peel off no problem and then the discs will play perfect .......it took me ages to realise this and by that time I had thrown away countless non replaceable recordings.

If you do have some that won't peel just soak them in water because water does not harm the discs!

I thought it would be impossible to peel those labels off but it isnt they just lift right off!


above link will give you a great ripper for windows pc I am using win7 but I bet it will work on later versions too use compatibility mode!

It gives you lots of different methods for ripping
 

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I'm posting this here because I've seen a bunch of members offer to digitize and restore old audio tapes, so I'm hoping someone can help.

I have a bunch of CDRs from the late '90s given to me with labels glued on the non-playing sides. The files on the discs are all .cda files, none of which would play on a Mac. Using a PC, I converted them all to .wav files using a program called Switch Sound File Converter. The files now play on the PC but all have that static-y noise in the background.
etc etc . . .
There are a'plenty of free & quality CD/CD-R audio ripping software programs out there. Once you get the WAV files on your PC -- there's one program I HIGHLY recommend to denoise, remaster, edit and so forth called GoldWave: GoldWave Digital Audio Editing Software

I have been using GoldWave since 2002. I use it to master/create music (yes, I said create music) and then submit my WAV files for official album releases over the years.

I use GoldWave to remaster audio for video, to seamlessly edit songs, combine songs into a soundtrack for my own listening pleasure or for my music promo YouTube channel: Jazz Rock Fusion & Synthesizer Music

GoldWave is a superb program created by a guy in New Foundland, Canada. It is quite affordable and very easy to use. It will actually gradully educate you on how to create great audio. You see visually your audio file and thus you understand audio.

Get your old noisy, low volume, crappy WAV files pristine via GoldWave and then burn them to new CD-Rs or copy them to a few external multi terabyte hard drives like I do with all my motherload of audio.
Enjoy!

www.SourceCodeX.com
 

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I'm posting this here because I've seen a bunch of members offer to digitize and restore old audio tapes, so I'm hoping someone can help.

I have a bunch of CDRs from the late '90s given to me with labels glued on the non-playing sides. The files on the discs are all .cda files, none of which would play on a Mac. Using a PC, I converted them all to .wav files using a program called Switch Sound File Converter. The files now play on the PC but all have that static-y noise in the background.

I tried Audacity's noise reduction filter, but it requires sampling the unwanted noise by itself, and the static always seems to appear on top of the music only. I've searched online for audio restoration software and have seen recommendations like VLC, but none specify eliminating this specific problem.

I'm well aware of the longevity of CDRs, and the music on these discs, of course, is irreplaceable (hence trying to back them up now).

Is there any hope for retrieving the music on these discs without the static, or are my converted-with-noise .wav files the best results I'm likely to get? I imagine I'm not the only person here who would benefit from any suggestions.

Many thanks in advance!

(I also posted this in the Home Recording forum, so please forgive the double-post.)
This suggestion is going to sound odd, but it may work for you. Years ago, there was a really cheap DVD player with an awful picture for $40 new called a Cyberhome CH-DVD-500. With 1 or 2 exceptions, it could play ANYTHING that none of my other cd or dvd players were unable to play due to burned discs gone bad And that included $1k-$2k players). If you can find one, it might fix it. You would have to record from Analog outs to a home cd recorder or to analog ins in a pc sound card, but it might get you the music back with a slight loss of quality if it worked. There's 1 on ebay right now for $15, but they want a ton for shipping. Might be worth looking for if you have a standalone cd recorder or a sound card with analog inputs. I did save a number of burned discs with mine back in the day before I learned to only purchase premium discs (which have pretty much disappeared from the market today).
 
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