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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there guys, just wondering if I was to get a simple 12 bar blues rythm backing to practice playing some lead and licks over... like to make the licks up how to go about this?

Like if I was going to do a solo, over any backing where should I start? learning scale shapes and modes? I have done a lot of learning over the past month since I found this site. But everything I play sounds too scale like, or bluesy.
Im in a bit of a rut with this, once I break this barrier I believe i will be a much more competant player.

Anyway a few tips on how I should develop some techniques would be great if possible

Thanks guys - Lim
 

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Listen to as much music as you possibly can. Try transcribing other peoples music as well to get some ideas. :thumb:
 

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Da Blooze Guy
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Unfortunately, it's time and experience that will help you the most. A while back my son was in the same boat. He practiced scales for hours each day, and he got very fast compared to me..........but that was all he could do. I got him playing to different backing tracks and just jamming with me, and sure enough he started to put a little taste and melody into his playing. The next step for him is playing with other musicians, (he is in his high school jazz band) and learning how to react to live musicians. Now his is as good as me...................almost :D
 

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limnuy said:
Hey there guys, just wondering if I was to get a simple 12 bar blues rythm backing to practice playing some lead and licks over... like to make the licks up how to go about this?
That is a definate must I think. Playing over tracks has aided me a great deal. Also I like to just play to music I listen to...not necissarily what is being played, but becomming a part of it. I try anyway.

Like if I was going to do a solo, over any backing where should I start? learning scale shapes and modes? I have done a lot of learning over the past month since I found this site. But everything I play sounds too scale like, or bluesy.
Im in a bit of a rut with this, once I break this barrier I believe i will be a much more competant player.
Yep, that is a big major obsticle to break through. I certainly had to and am still fighting it a lot. I just kept playing. Listen to your backing and see if there is something you can grab hold of and work with.

About sounding bluesy all the time, well maybe you are a blues player. I recommend trying to break out of it but there is nothing wrong with playing the blues all the time. Blues are pretty cool and will serve you well in many places. But learn where your scale degrees are in that and you can expand by playing major 3rds, major 7ths, etc...

You could try this site: http://www.zentao.com/guitar/patterns/

It might help you break out by providing you with something to play and some ideas on how to create things to play. I myself could use some practice on these...
 

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Da Blooze Guy
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Had to chime in again. By bluesy, you mean your just using pentatonic scales, that is not necessarily a bad thing. Until you learn some more theory and scales, you can still use those pentatonics, for instance:

Record yourself playing a few major seventh chords, play each chord for a few bars so you can hear how this works. Say you started off with a Cmaj7, just play E minor pentatonic (from the 3rd of C major), don't do any bending just slides, legato, etc. This gives you a maj9 sound, all of a sudden your sounding a little hipper. Now play A minor (the 6th of C)over that, and you get a real mellow maj6 sound, play the the minor pentatonic based on the 7th of the major scale, in this case B, and you get a maj7#11 sound, now you're starting to sound lydian, and that's really hip. This works for everything,

Minor 7th chords: play minor pentatonics base on the root, 2nd, or 5th, and you get a minor 9, 11, and 13th sound respectively. If the chord is a minor7flat 5, just play the minor pentatonic based on the 4th, and the notes you get will include the 6th, 9th, 11th, and that flat 5.

Dominant 7th chords, no problem, if you play minor pentatonics based on the 2nd or 5th, you get a very cool suspended dominant type sound.

But wait, what about altered dominant chords you ask.

C7#9--play C minor to get the 1, #9, 4, 5, b7

C7(#9, b9), C7(#5)--E minor will get you the #9, #11, #5, 7, b9

C7(#5, #9) --F minor will get you the 11, #5, b7, 1, #9

C7(#5, b9)--B minor will get you the b7, b9, #9, 11, #5

And all of a sudden, you are a pretty hip sounding jazzer type guy, all without leaving the pentatonic realm. I'm not saying don't learn your modes, arpeggios, etc. But this will get you going while you do.

I hope I haven't wasted too much bandwidth, or bored anyone with this, it's just that I got really stoked when I first discovered t this. Hope it can help someone else.
 

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I started off by learning the basic blues scale, and my goal when I started soloing wasnt to play cool licks or fast runs, it was just not to hit any wrong notes.
Then with time and experience, as other people said, you get to know your instrument.
I still only know the basic blues scale, but I break out of it a lot, probably playing all kinds of other scales and modes that I'm not aware of.
Listening to lots of music helps as well, as it gives you some ideas of what you can do. Even if its not intentional something might stick in the back of your skull and come out through your fingers when you least expect it :laugh:
 

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well if you are learning to play the blues, just remember what BB King said..."playing the blues is like telling a joke....you have to insert pauses, change your voice volume, and talk slower or faster....same way with guitar." :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The thing is guys I know alot of chord and scale theory, the only thing that stumps me is where to start when im about to pop off a solo...

Eg. when your about to do a solo over some chord progression do you
*Find what key its in
*Work out how you want it to sound

Maybe im going into something I shouldnt there, but I cant think of any other direction out of this. :D

I think playing in block scales and modes might be my problem... I dont know why, but maybe if i let a little bit of fretboard movement in. Have you guys ever noticed anything or experienced with this?

Cheers Limnuy
 

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limnuy said:
The thing is guys I know alot of chord and scale theory, the only thing that stumps me is where to start when im about to pop off a solo...

Eg. when your about to do a solo over some chord progression do you
*Find what key its in
*Work out how you want it to sound

Maybe im going into something I shouldnt there, but I cant think of any other direction out of this. :D

I think playing in block scales and modes might be my problem... I dont know why, but maybe if i let a little bit of fretboard movement in. Have you guys ever noticed anything or experienced with this?

Cheers Limnuy
It is quite common to get stuck in boxes. We learn our paterns that way, we practice them over and over that way, it is no wonder we get stuck. You have to purposfully break out. Start moving up the neck with your leads. Slide into the next pattern and the next, etc. Practice scales on one string. Practice moving at a diagonal direction up the neck, etc.
 

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Scandinavian noise maker!
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Heh yeah the learning curve for music is steep.
Biggest thing is a sense of time and big ears for melody lines, sometimes it is also good to play beyond the safebarrier, throw yourself into it, I do that from time to time when I feel to comfy, that is easy when you have rounded 20 years of playing :wutblau:
Hear alot of music, remove anything that holds you down in a box, when I was younger it was not the theory and scales/chords that really did it for me, it was reading about other players, how they related to their music, how they felt about the notes they played or did not.
And I still keep my fingers nimble, I almost play on a daily basis, had my fair share of the odd bands and sidekick jobs, I hear anything from Mozart to Jeff Beck, opera, metal, blues, jazz, fusion, worldmusic, lieders, latin, techno, pop.
I am not snobbish about music, it is just a big wide thing....it is awesome and lots of fun!
 

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Captain DB... Savvy ?
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i bet we have all had this problem . what you want to start doing it to start looking at the fretboard both horizontally and vertically . not only can you go up n down through the strings in boxes but you can go left to right and right to left . you can try bending "wrong" notes into a right note or simply go to www.all-guitar-chords-com and look up some scales and it will show you how to play them all over the neck , this is helpful because the same note will sounds different depending on the string you play it on . don't get tied down by boxes . use the neck horizontally as much as you can , i do alot of horizontal runs and they have a different sound than the vertical ones i do . try slipping in some diminished stuff here and there too and the odd chromatic line just to make it different ... if you mix things up correctly it will sound spot on and there won't be any "boring" factor because its will have a higher element of unpredictability to it .

i hope that didn't confuse you cause i almost confused myself haha .
 
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limnuy said:
The thing is guys I know alot of chord and scale theory, the only thing that stumps me is where to start when im about to pop off a solo...

Hi!

Well, this is the tricky part of playing and the only advice I can give you is to try to listen to your own gut-feeling. After all, it´s your music and your sound that you want to express. Theory sure is good to know but it can only get you so far... in the end I believe all music comes from a (good-) gut-feeling. Trust it! :laugh:

Rock to live :bannana_g
 
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