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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do the sperzel locking tuners hold guitar in tune with tremolo may it be hardcore, middling, soft trem work?

Would they match up to the locking nuts?

cheers guys
fonosatch
 

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Napoleon Dynamite
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I have the locking Sperzels on my Brian Moore. I don't bang the shit outta that tremolo like I do on my Floyd Rose equiped Kramer, but it sure is hard to knock it out with moderate use. If I never use the trem, that sucker will not go out of tune for shit. Makes restringing smooth as silk too. They simply rock. Perhaps someone who's more aggressive with a trem and uses them will respond.
 

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Napoleon Dynamite
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I bought a set for my Fender but I am waiting for the next string change to install them.
 

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The locking tuners are great for light trem work, but keep in mind that a locking nut will lock the strings at the nut where locking tuners will not, and you have to consider the movement at the nut with only using locking tuners.
 

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Non-locking Shallers with the tall pegs rule. All that locking stuff adds up to too much bulk and too little nuance.:icon_thum
 

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i can vouch for them. i have them on my ibanez. they def hold the tune.
 

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Your results will depend quite a bit on other factors, most importantly the headstock design, nut material, and current condition of the nut. Any trem-equipped guitar without a locking nut is going to have at least some tuning stability problems under extremely heavy trem use but straight-pull non-tilt-back headstocks will suffer quite a bit less than tilt-back angled-string headstocks.

E.g., this would be relatively better:






Than this one is an extreme example of poor HS design where tuning stability is the major concern:




The more the strings angle away from the nut whether to the side, downwards, or a combination thereof, the more likely you are to experience tuning stability problems.

The Fender is super stable even under heavy use but it's also equipped with a tremsetter, locking vintage-style trem, & a roller nut.

If you don't get the results you're after at first, be sure that your nut is in good shape (no burrs in the slots, not even minimal binding on light/moderate bends, etc.) If that doesn't do it you might want to think about a graphite / slipstone / etc. type nut or even a roller nut and/or a tremsetter.

Tuning stability on vintage style trems is one of me pet peeves but luckily there are many good options and you can simply continue to add more until you arrive at what you're after.
 

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Hey thanks YetAnotherOne! You really nailed the key issues regarding the tilt of the headstock. However I have always found the problem to be with the bridge (string sadles and such).
 

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No doubt there are potential tuning stability issues at both ends of vintage trem-equipped guitars. Over the years I've been surprised by the number of non-locking guitars that I've picked up that had "tuning problems" only to later discover that the problems were mostly due to poor maintenance / setup.

One of the cooler things I've found that helps at the bridge end is the Fender / Floyd locking vintage trem:



That's one of those ideas whose time is long overdue but I don't know if Fender is selling them separately yet. Another that's worked well for me is the ABM roller saddle bridge on my Hamer though I'm not certain if you can still get those (and of course there's the "roller saddles are tone suckers" line of thinking to overcome). The Hipshot tremsetter is also great if you can tolerate the clunkiness it creates right around the zero point and if you don't mind the minor surgery that might be required to install one. Then there are the non-modification non-adventurous sorts of things that can be done but what fun is that? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah man that strat is cool but in the picture it looks like quite a funny nut? what is it because it looks like it could be quite good?

does it fit in the same spacing as the machine routed strat headstocks
 

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The nut on that one is the LSR roller nut that Fender uses on a few models. Someone will be along shortly to tell you that if you should be so foolish as to install one it'll suck all of the desirable tone and sustain right out of your axe. :D Personally I don't necessarily agree with that idea but your mileage may vary.

I doubt it's a drop-in replacement for many standard nuts but IIRC the required route width is 7/32".
 

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YetAnotherOne said:
The nut on that one is the LSR roller nut that Fender uses on a few models. Someone will be along shortly to tell you that if you should be so foolish as to install one it'll suck all of the desirable tone and sustain right out of your axe. :D Personally I don't necessarily agree with that idea but your mileage may vary.

I doubt it's a drop-in replacement for many standard nuts but IIRC the required route width is 7/32".
Once you do the roller nut, you can't go back to a regular nut, right? No wood to hold it from the back so you would have to retro fit
 

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I'd consider it a one-way trip. Even though the LSR is a lot smaller than the Wilkinson they used to use/offer you're still looking at around a quarter-inch route to install it. I suppose in theory you could pick up a larger nut and retrofit that back if you hated the roller nut but it'd be twice as wide as the original and if you had tuning problems with the original I'd imagine they'd just be that much worse with a wider nut.
 
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