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jesse91087 said:
i have a olp mm1 floyd rose guitar and its seem that the ernie ball guitar action is way lower is there something i can do when i lower it to keep from some frets buzzing
If the Ernie balls are bringing your action down your knew strings must be of a lighter guage.
A lighter guage requires less tension to bring your guitar up to pitch which would inturn lower your action by letting the tremolo bridge rest farther back.

The only way to fix fret buzzing is to make a truss rod adjustment (only if the neck is not postioned correctly and that is the problem)
Sometimes there is an adjustment where the neck meets the body
( that can help if it needs it)
A fret job might be required, you should take a seriuos look down your neck and see if it looks straight, also check for bowing etc.
If you see something off, use these adjustments and do a little fret work if a fret is high or a fret is worn using common sense based on geometry.

If everything is perfect you will have to raise your action!

With a floyd you can do this three ways, a truss rod adjustment (losin it)
Spring adjustment in the back, losin them off and then retune, do this over and over until it is where you want it ( remembering to tune back to pitch each time or your tremolo will not be resting where it will end up)

Or there are two screws with recessed areas that your floyd pivets on, these screws can be raised a little. But not to much because as you raise them you take away from the integrity of the floyd set up!!

Good luck, Golden Ears

PS Don't be afraid to try, that is the only way you will learn and if you use common sense you won't likely wreck anything. ( make fine adjustments when playing with truss rods and if it feels like its just to damm tight to move do not move it, take it to an expert)
Also don't strip the head on your truss rod because you only get one head and if you strip it you have big problems.
Make sure that your tools fit (right allen keys for example) and make sure that you do not turn without control or you could cause damage.
 

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Not sure if I understand the problem... is it that you changed strings and now your action is lower and you get buzz with the new strings?

If that's the case, they clearly offer less tension than your previous set. This could be because they're a lighter gauge, as goldenears suggests. Or simply different material/construction.

Either way, I think the easiest thing to do is not tweaking the truss rod, but decreasing the tension of the trem springs, so taht they balance your strings again. This will also affect slightly how tight the trem works (slightly, because it should only need a slight change). All you have to do is loosen up a bit the two wood screws that hold the metal claw where the springs attach. This reduces the tension from teh springs, and your strings will lift a bit. Do it little by litle until the bridge is floating at teh same position it used to... and that's it.

Alternatively... go back to the strings you were using before :)
 

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mcnach said:
Not sure if I understand the problem... is it that you changed strings and now your action is lower and you get buzz with the new strings?

If that's the case, they clearly offer less tension than your previous set. This could be because they're a lighter gauge, as goldenears suggests. Or simply different material/construction.

Either way, I think the easiest thing to do is not tweaking the truss rod, but decreasing the tension of the trem springs, so taht they balance your strings again. This will also affect slightly how tight the trem works (slightly, because it should only need a slight change). All you have to do is loosen up a bit the two wood screws that hold the metal claw where the springs attach. This reduces the tension from teh springs, and your strings will lift a bit. Do it little by litle until the bridge is floating at teh same position it used to... and that's it.

Alternatively... go back to the strings you were using before :)

I had mentioned the spring adjustment as an option in my first post but adjusting the truss rod is a more common way of making a final slight adjustment in a set up.
When ever I have had a guitar set up by my master luthier (the dude is smoking, he made the double neck guitars for Rush's "A Fair Well To Kings etc)
I would always be picky about my action and ask for a slight adjusment when I was trying it out after a mod or set up.
When ever he did the action adjustment after a set up, he would do it by the truss rod and here is why: (just speculation because I never asked him lol)

When you adjust a tremolos position you effect the guitars intonation and the swing of the tremolo and its feel etc. but with a slight truss rod adjustment you get a good result very quickly without having as much of an effect on other things like intonation.

For a guy that is not experienced or is lacking a nack for set ups, it can be a big thing to start adjusting a tremolo, where a truss rod adjustment can compensate for a string guage with a quarter revolution in some cases.

Golden Ears
 

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GoldenEars said:
I had mentioned the spring adjustment as an option in my first post but adjusting the truss rod is a more common way of making a final slight adjustment in a set up.
When ever I have had a guitar set up by my master luthier (the dude is smoking, he made the double neck guitars for Rush's "A Fair Well To Kings etc)
I would always be picky about my action and ask for a slight adjusment when I was trying it out after a mod or set up.
When ever he did the action adjustment after a set up, he would do it by the truss rod and here is why: (just speculation because I never asked him lol)

When you adjust a tremolos position you effect the guitars intonation and the swing of the tremolo and its feel etc. but with a slight truss rod adjustment you get a good result very quickly without having as much of an effect on other things like intonation.

For a guy that is not experienced or is lacking a nack for set ups, it can be a big thing to start adjusting a tremolo, where a truss rod adjustment can compensate for a string guage with a quarter revolution in some cases.

Golden Ears
I am no expert, but I have spent enough time messing about with guitars, modifying them etc (well, it's easier than playing well :) ) and I don't have a problem with either adjusting trem or truss rod. However I feel that I'd go for the truss rod when I think the neck just has too much or too little relief, essentially to give it just the curvature it needs to not buzz excessively. If I change string gauge, yeah, that's probably something I might look at, although you can go from a 9-42 to a 10-46 set in a strat-scale guitar and be fine without truss rod adjustment (in my own case, it seems to be more of a weather-related issue). Essentially, truss rod adjustment takes care of rather subtle curvature issues (affected by string tension).
But if I install a lighter set of strings on a trem-equipped guitar, the equilibrium strings-springs is broken and the bridge is going to fall lower, creating buzzes... you would need quite a large truss rod tweak to solve that, probably. I think (and it's just my opinion, I'm not trying to say my way is the only way or something! lol) that in this case I'd first try to get the balance right, bringing the bridge to the right height... and then worry about the rest if I have to. I don't think we should use the truss rod to correct a problem caused mostly by an incorrect bridge height.

Regarding how difficult is to do one or the other... I think adjusting spring tension is far easier, and less dangerous. It's quite an obvious system: stretch, you get more pull... the inverse for the opposite effect. It works immediately, and you see what's happening clearly. It also gives you the chance to set the feel of the trem (add a spring, remove a spring... etc for tougher or softer action... etc). It's easy, really.
With the truss rod you have to go little by little... and go away and let the neck react, as it takes time for it to settle. Quite often inexperienced people try too hard, or are not sure which way to turn...
We should really learn to deal with both, as they take care of different ('though overlapping) issues. There's little as satisfying as getting your guitar *just* the way you want it. And we can't all afford our own dedicated star guitar tech :)
 

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mcnach said:
I am no expert, but I have spent enough time messing about with guitars, modifying them etc (well, it's easier than playing well :) ) and I don't have a problem with either adjusting trem or truss rod.

haha, well its kinda ironic because we are both trying to give the easier solution and just disagreeing on which is. lol
But in fact a minor truss rod adjustment can do quite alot and its not that complicated, you just need a good allen key that fits properely and a person needs to not put an off radius torque on it and then its simply a matter of turning it a quarter turn counter clock wise in this case. And that won't mess up the curvature of the neck unless its already tremendously lose or something, so all these things require judgement.
With the tremolo adjustment for guys like us who have done it a hundred times, its quite simple but for an inexperienced player it might be a little strange when everything goes out of wack and he has to compensate.

And the fact that he has to always start from a point of perfect tune to be able to judge what he has done with a tremolo adjustment seems more confusing for a beginner from my point of view.
Anyways both will work and if it is a major adjustment then the wammi way is better but if it is slight I always go with the truss rod and have had great success with this tecnique every times.

Anyways just some food for thought I don't claim to be a star luthier lol I just know one but I have done some pretty serious mods starting at 7 or so lol.

I did a bridge relocation and total body modification quite professionally when I was 11 to a friends bass. I remember him looking quite tramitized as I started to drill big holes in his bass hahahahhaha........but the bridge was located incorrectly from the factory and it had to be relocated for correct intonation but the shape of the body did not allow for that easilly so that little kid (being me) totally modified that guitar and it worked and looked perfect. I don't know where I got the B$lls to try such a thing as a kid but I grew up on a farm rebuilding machinery, tractors, cars etc so I guess that I had a neive confidence lol

But till this day the owner of that bass tells that story and how that bass still plays perfect and has perfect intonation.

See with a truss rod, if the neck is not warped and the tension is adequet, taking off a little will not screw it up because who is to say what the correct tension for that neck should be anyways. There is no magic ftlb amount, it varies from guitar to guitar so you might be fixing your action and improving the tension situation or making it worse but whatever change that is made is so slight that it should not cause a problem.
I have been doing this on 6 american strats, several acoustics and every other guitar that I have ever owned and the many customer guitars that I have set up for years with no negative feedback or issues.

Anyways just another point of view, thats what this site is all about opinions and we all have one. lol

Golden Ears
 
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