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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The Beatles
Revolver Remixed and Remastered

Project completed October 25, 2021
First posted on Guitars101.com

Tracklist:
  1. Taxman
  2. Eleanor Rigby
  3. I'm Only Sleeping
  4. Love You To
  5. Here, There And Everywhere
  6. Yellow Submarine
  7. She Said She Said
  8. Good Day Sunshine
  9. And Your Bird Can Sing
  10. For No One
  11. Dr. Robert
  12. I Want To Tell You
  13. Got To Get You Into My Life
  14. Tomorrow Never Knows
All tracks remixed and remastered from the 1978 "Big Blue Box" LP (PCS 7009), except "Here, There And Everywhere", "Yellow Submarine", and "Got To Get You Into My Life", remixed and remastered from the Japan Toshiba-EMI CD (TOCP-51117).


First, thank you for all of the wonderful feedback and constructive criticism. It has helped me learn a lot about the process and The Beatles numerous releases. I went pretty deep on this project exploring many available sources. I examined the 2009 CD, the LP releases, the Japan CDs (based on their LP master tapes), and the "Rock Band" multitracks. I quickly discovered what others have said about the 1987/2009 releases sounding much more sterile and "digital" than the original releases. I found the "Big Blue Box" LP to sound significantly better. The "Rock Band" multitracks offer amazing separation, but they tended to suffer from the same sterile quality as the CDs. I'm sure others (like @}{eywood) will be able to do a lot more with those, given proper mastering. Almost all tracks here come from a 24-bit 192khz rip of the 1978 "Big Blue Box" LP. A few tracks sounded a bit better coming from the Japan Toshiba-EMI CD, so I used that source for 3 of the tracks.

Enjoy!

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Congrats, mate. You nailed it. The horns in Got To Get You Into My Life - WOW! Finally, a Revolver with balls! I'm seriously hoping that you'll tackle Paperback Writer, Rain, Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out. Reckon you'd mix the definitive version of those too. Cheers, Hummus!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This looks fantastic, many thanks for all your hard work. I'm coming at this as an absolute novice, are you able to say what changes were made in the 'remix & remaster' version as opposed to the 'remix'
Good question. A remix involves taking the individual instruments and vocals and re-arranging them in terms of stereo positioning and volume. A remaster involves changing EQ levels (e.g., bass and treble at different frequencies), adding compression (audio compression, not MP3-style), and other techniques to "shape" the overall sound.

Here, I use some specialized AI tools to automatically separate a recording into different "stems" (or tracks). I use 2 software programs to automatically generate stereo tracks of vocals, bass, drums, and guitar/keys. To re-master, I simply use an automated tool called "Mastering Assistant" found in iZotope Ozone (Ozone 9 Help Documentation). I use the "Vintage" setting with "Medium Intensity".

I provide both the standard mastering and remastered versions to give you the choice of having the recording have the same character as the original release or give it a slightly different sound. Depending on your preferences, the remastered versions might sound better to your ears (e.g., have better highs and lows) or you may find them to be too loud. Of course, you can always take the straight remix and remaster to your own liking.

A month ago, I was a novice too. If you have any interest in this, I would suggest playing around. It is a lot of fun -- and you can quickly go down the rabbit hole.

Here is the blog post that started my journey: Suggestions for Using Spleeter
Some free tools to get you started:
AI Stem Creation: Moises.AI offers free online splitting of up to 5 minutes of music at a time.
Audio Mixing/Mastering: Audacity is a great start
 

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Good question. A remix involves taking the individual instruments and vocals and re-arranging them in terms of stereo positioning and volume. A remaster involves changing EQ levels (e.g., bass and treble at different frequencies), adding compression (audio compression, not MP3-style), and other techniques to "shape" the overall sound.

Here, I use some specialized AI tools to automatically separate a recording into different "stems" (or tracks). I use 2 software programs to automatically generate stereo tracks of vocals, bass, drums, and guitar/keys. To re-master, I simply use an automated tool called "Mastering Assistant" found in iZotope Ozone (Ozone 9 Help Documentation). I use the "Vintage" setting with "Medium Intensity".

I provide both the standard mastering and remastered versions to give you the choice of having the recording have the same character as the original release or give it a slightly different sound. Depending on your preferences, the remastered versions might sound better to your ears (e.g., have better highs and lows) or you may find them to be too loud. Of course, you can always take the straight remix and remaster to your own liking.

A month ago, I was a novice too. If you have any interest in this, I would suggest playing around. It is a lot of fun -- and you can quickly go down the rabbit hole.

Here is the blog post that started my journey: Suggestions for Using Spleeter
Some free tools to get you started:
AI Stem Creation: Moises.AI offers free online splitting of up to 5 minutes of music at a time.
Audio Mixing/Mastering: Audacity is a great start
Thank you for the explanation and the heads-up to the tools you have used, it's greatly appreciated.
 
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