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I do not get these at all. If someone has a good website that can explain this stuff to any idiot--I'll give you my respect, and 500 points (no not bribery haha). I serriously dont get how chords work. One day I'd just like for someone to say--play a E9, and I'd be able to play it. I know it means add the ninth..but what does that mean.
 

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jazzy rock boy
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here's one site that's pretty good -
www.musictheory.net
pm me if you want some in-depth stuff. i'll post something when i have the time.:biggthump
 

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Yeah, Ricci Adams' site is great. Going through the lessons should give you a good foundation.

I really recommend either playing a keyboard instrument or learning to read standard music notation (or both) if you want to learn this stuff, as it's just so much more straight forward... but I'll try to summarize what you mentioned in your post/title:

A triad is just a chord with 3 notes. It's mainly used when talking about your basic chords: major, minor, diminshed, augmented. Triads are important because it takes 3 notes before we can start to hear the real qualities of a chord.

A chord progression is basically a series of chords. Usually when you talk about chord progressions, you're talking about either the actual chord structure of a piece of music, or you're talking about general progressions (like "ii-V-I progression" or "12-bar blues progression").

Intervals are basically the distances between notes.

As far as being able to build chords, you have 2 main options on a fretted instrument: learning chord shapes, and learning the fretboard's layout and theory behind chords.

If you know a D9 chord, and you move your fingers up 2 frets, you're now playing an E9 chord by moving the shape.

Building chords from the actual notes of the fretboard will take longer to learn, but is much more beneficial to your playing. You'll need to learn the notes of the fretboard, what intervals make up different chords types, and be able to apply those intervals to a root note. So if you wanted to play a C major chord, you'd have to:

1. Know that a major chord has a major 3rd and a perfect 5th
2. Know that from a root of C, the major 3rd is E, and the perfect 5th is G
3. Know where all the C's, E's and G's on the fretboard are so you can actually finger the chord.

If you're unfamiliar with this stuff, it sounds a lot more complicated than it really is. You just have to keep at it until you get it, it's like puzzle where you add one piece at a time, and over time you start to see the bigger picture.
 
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