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PantallicA
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive looked around on some sites to try and find a 100 watt amp coz that would be good for blowing my windows out and if i ever do a gig at least ill have somthin loud. I heard the fenders are really loud for what they are. and peavey lack power and tone. and well marshall are to expensive for coz a 50watt one is about 800 bucks so fuk that. but i just want your ideas on a really loud 100 watt amp but has lots of tone and etc.

thanx :jam: :drunk: :jot: :dunno:
 

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Try the PV 5150, Triple XXX, and JSX, they are all awesome, and you can get really good deals on 'em used. Paid $370 for my 5150. It is amazin'. I never really wanted a Marshal cuz' they're expensive and everyone uses them.
 

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Your own personal Satan
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I'm no expert, but I love my Line 6 Spider 212. 100 Watt combo amp with some great effects built in. You can also use the same pedal (FB4) that the POD uses, if you happen to have a POD. About $500 new.
 
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Do you want a Solid State amplifier of a Tube amp? A tube amp will definately be much louder, will give you sweet overdrive that solid states can't touch.

A 100 watt tube amp won't be much louder than a 50 watt tube amp. You need 10x the wattage to produce twice the loudness, so a 100watt amp would be twice as loud as a 10watt amp.

Trust me on this, a 100watt amp will be way to loud for your bedroom, specially if you go with a tube amp. I have a 40 watt tube amp and it's just too much, I'm going to replace the power tubes with some THD Yellowjackets probably to lower the wattage so I can overdrive the amp on the clean channel earlier.
 

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PantallicA
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
hmmmmm i could go for a 60 watt. whats a nice 50watt tube amp. brand etc. a link to the site would be really helpful thanx.
 
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HeReSy said:
hmmmmm i could go for a 60 watt. whats a nice 50watt tube amp. brand etc. a link to the site would be really helpful thanx.
You gotta play them and figure out which one suits you.
 

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Da Blooze Guy
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5,854 Posts
I have a Roland Cube 30 and a Peavey Classic 20. I've use both for home practice, and in live band situations. If the venue is too large for the Peavey, I just mic it. I have even put it at the front of the stage facing like a monitor and mic'd it up. It keeps the stage volume tolerable for everyone. I'm not against big amps, heck, I played for years through an Ampeg V4 stack......but my hearing also suffered for it. And this from Guitarnuts:

There is absolutely no venue that requires a larger amp and cabinet than one suitable for use as a stage monitor – provided that the members of the band don't get into a juvenile competition to outdo each other. Need more feedback? Fine, move closer to the amp, for crying out loud! Typically, a really good 30-watt rig with a suitable cab is ample! Depending on the composition of your band and the variety of venues you play, an even smaller rig mic'ed to the PA and then pumped to stage monitors may be even better. Note that while a good 30-watt rig has ample volume you may end up having to buy a more powerful rig to get other desired features.
At a small venue, a 15 to 30 watt amp can be placed behind the band in a traditional position and used without a mic. In this position the rig serves as a monitor for the guitarist and as the primary amplification for the guitar.
At a medium venue, the small rig can be placed in front of and facing the guitarist as a monitor, and be mic'ed and run through the band's PA. The band's PA speakers are placed along the front of the stage and facing out. This arrangement allows the sound to be balanced at the mixer and allows the band to flood a medium to large venue without damaging their hearing.
At a large to giant venue, that same small rig can be arranged much as described above but now the band's mixer feeds the house PA. This is the only way to reach the back of the room without dangerous SPLs near the stage at a large venue and would be required no matter how powerful a rig the guitarist has.
Smaller equipment takes up less space on cramped stages.
The money you save by purchasing a smaller amp can fund a nice power conditioner to protect your equipment and clean up powerline noise – the conditioner will cost less too since now you don't need one that will handle a billion watts.
If the band members will agree not to compete, all of them can recognize significant savings by not having to purchase unnecessary equipment.
Your band is far more likely to be called back for a repeat engagement if you provide a well-balanced, easily managed performance than if you are just obnoxiously and uncontrollably loud.
Many guitarists already have the monster amp – it isn't necessary to get rid of it. You can use an attenuator (see the attenuator myth) and perhaps a smaller cab.
 

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Does it have to be 100 watts? I picked up a 50 watt Traynor YSR-1 head for $125 at a local music shop. I had it modded by Trace at VoodooAmps. for another $450 including shipping. Couldn't find a better amp for that price. I now have a Plexi for one quarter the price.

I also use an attenuator with it for smaller jams. 50 watts is louder than you think!
 

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Rythameen said:
I have a Roland Cube 30 and a Peavey Classic 20. I've use both for home practice, and in live band situations.
I've read good things about the Peavey Classic 20 as far having exceptional tone for a small tube amp. I understand that the Cube 30 has built-in effects, which is useful, but how does it compare to the Peavey for basic tone? Is the Classic 20 the gem that some folks make it out to be??
 

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Da Blooze Guy
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ksdb said:
I've read good things about the Peavey Classic 20 as far having exceptional tone for a small tube amp. I understand that the Cube 30 has built-in effects, which is useful, but how does it compare to the Peavey for basic tone? Is the Classic 20 the gem that some folks make it out to be??


I bought the Roland first, mainly for its clean sounds, also the Fender models on it sounded quite good. I still use it a lot for clean tones and love it. Then I stopped by the music store one day just to ogle things and saw this little tweed amp sitting there. I plugged in a Strat and cranked it about halfway, and was blown away. For a little 20 watt amp with one ten it wailed. The sound was great for me, I was looking for just a little breakup and sustain and got exactly what I wanted. If you're looking for a real metal sound, this amp isn't for you, but if you want blues, classic rock tones then its great. I run a Digitech Overdrive pedal in front of it, mainly for an added volume boost for some leads and not for dirt, and it sounds sweet both with my Strat and LP Junior. With the junior, I can come close to that old Santana sound. It would be nice if it had a presence control, but for $125 bucks, it fits my needs perfectly. And live, I plugged it into a 2x12 cabinet and could not believe the sound level coming out of it. It was a small club, and it easily competed with a 50 watt amp. At least among the people I know, the trend seems to be toward smaller amps, and for now I'm happy. As far as comparing the two, The Peavey has just that little bit of warmth that comes from tubes and makes you want to play forever. I didn't realize I was rattling on, I hope this answers your question.
 

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Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I've seen the Classic 20 selling for well over $200 on Ebay; I'd kind of like to have one or at least try one out, but not for that much $$$$. The Peavey Classic 30 is interesting too; I did play one at a music store, but I was thinking it might be a little bigger and louder than what I want at home. Plus some of the reviews I've read make it sound like the Classic 20 might produce better tones — who knows?? I played a Delta Blues 210, which sounded better to me than the Classic 30. The DB210 had a much, much warmer sound, but it's way to big for what I want (and more expensive). I'm considering a Laney LC15R (for the right price). It is said to compare very favorably to the Classic 20, but it is harder to find. Such is life.
 

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Da Blooze Guy
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ksdb said:
Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I've seen the Classic 20 selling for well over $200 on Ebay; I'd kind of like to have one or at least try one out, but not for that much $$$$. The Peavey Classic 30 is interesting too; I did play one at a music store, but I was thinking it might be a little bigger and louder than what I want at home. Plus some of the reviews I've read make it sound like the Classic 20 might produce better tones — who knows?? I played a Delta Blues 210, which sounded better to me than the Classic 30. The DB210 had a much, much warmer sound, but it's way to big for what I want (and more expensive). I'm considering a Laney LC15R (for the right price). It is said to compare very favorably to the Classic 20, but it is harder to find. Such is life.

That's the word I was looking for, warmth, while the Cube 30 has the great clean tones, it can be a little sterile. The Peavey 20 however just has a sweet tone that I personally like. Good luck in your search, I have heard good things about the Laney.
 

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i agree with the 100watt being overkill. your volume on stage needs to be only loud enough for you to hear and you don't want your stage volume getting out into the crowd. that is what the p.a. system if for. your guitar will sound 10 times better through the p.a. than it will onstage. get yourself a good sounding used 40 0r 50 watt preferably tube amp and maybe get a v-amp or similar modeler to create your tone and effects and then you can pick any amp from fender to boogie and everything inbetween. i got rid of my marshall jcm800 stack that i was never able to turn up past 2 and got a v-amp2 and have never been happier with my sound live. i put enough in the monitors to satisfy me and the P.a. blasts the rest to the crowd.
 

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Rythameen said:
There is absolutely no venue that requires a larger amp and cabinet than one suitable for use as a stage monitor [...] Typically, a really good 30-watt rig with a suitable cab is ample! [...] Note that while a good 30-watt rig has ample volume you may end up having to buy a more powerful rig to get other desired features.
Amen. Truthfully, if you're talking about a tube amp, the cabinet will make more difference in volume (SPL output) than the amp will.

I still use a Marshall 3203 as the head in my primary rig. It's a 30-watt tube deal, and I've used it next to 50W & 100W amps at large gigs and never had trouble hearing myself. I use one or two cabinets depending on the size of the venue. This has been my sole rig for jobs as small as dinner music jazz and as large as a rock gig opening for Bad Company. Outdoor gigs - no problem - even doing the Harley rally at Myrtle Beach Speedway(13,00 bikers :rock: ).

The reason you might go for a 100W is the difference in sound. All other things being equal, the 100W amp will generally sound crisper and have more 'touch', due to the extra headroom.

Hope this helps,

MM


....but, this one goes to eleven......
 

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i agree with you about the cabinet being a key factor. i just feel that the harder you work an all tube marshall the better they sound and they sustain longer. yes not as punchy but dirtier and a little more ballsy what is what i presonally wanted in my sound. just my opinion but i prefer the sound of a 50watt run at 8 or 9 volume over a 100watt run at 4. i'll bet your 30 watt sounds sweet when cranked.
 
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